Rebecca Spera
Rebecca Spera loves meeting people in the community and helping tell their stories. She joined the ABC13 news team in July of 2014 as a features reporter, and in March 2015, she joined the afternoon newscasts as a Traffic Anchor.

Prior to her news duties, Rebecca spent six years as the producer and host of Mirror/Mirror on the Live Well Network. Through the beauty, fashion, and health show, Rebecca found her niche. She learned and shared ways for women to look and feel their best and plans to continue sharing those tips with Houston.

Before joining Live Well Network, Rebecca spent three years producing and reporting for KHOU's Great Day Houston. Her team there was small but strong. Rebecca quickly learned that wearing multiple (fashionable) hats is what it takes to work in the TV business.

Rebecca is a two-time Gracie Award winner and an Emmy award winner.

Rebecca is a New Jersey native and earned a Bachelors of Arts Degree in Communications at La Salle University in Philadelphia. Her husband is a Houston native, and they've settled in Clear Lake. They enjoy spending their weekends on the water boating and fishing (yes, she's been an avid angler since childhood). Rebecca may not have been born here, but she's happy to call Houston home.

Archive
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According to the American Chiropractic Association, 31 million Americans deal with back pain, and it can be debilitating. But back exercises could help you zap the pain.
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Less than one-third of adults with autism have a job, but 75 percent of them want to work.