With inflation rising, Houstonians are wondering when they'll get a break

ByDerrick Lewis via KTRK logo
Friday, September 16, 2022
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As prices for just about everything continue to rise, many Houstonians are wondering when they'll get a break.

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) -- As prices for just about everything continue to rise, many Houstonians are wondering when they'll get a break.

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, inflation right now in Houston is higher than the national average.

"Just like gas went down, we are praying these prices go down," Shantel Austin said.

SEE ALSO: Tips for managing your finances during inflation

Austin went grocery shopping on Thursday and said it's becoming harder to afford groceries.

"I shop cheap," she said. "I try to buy what's in my price range."

Inflation in Houston is at 9.5%, and has been higher than the national average of 8.3%, for several months now.

SEE ALSO: Houston saddled with 10th highest inflation rate in US, new study says

"Just across the board, anything you purchase, you're paying more for it than you were this time last year," Patrick Jankowski, the chief economist at Greater Houston Partnership, said.

Jankowski also explained when prices for basic needs could go down.

"Inflation will eventually subside. The problem is, it's taking too long to subside," he said. "Most of the economists out there thought that we would have seen a more dramatic drop with the inflation numbers we just received for August, but that did not happen."

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, from August 2021 to August 2022, Houston has seen a bigger increase in groceries, dining out, shelter, electricity, and recreation than the national average.

"Unfortunately, it's going to be with us for a while," Jankowski said. "It's going to be with us for probably, at least, another 12 months."

Austin said that while she's shopping, she goes for the less expensive option when she has a choice.

SEE ALSO: From budgeting to carpooling, here's how Houstonians deal with rising costs

"Now, you really have to watch how much you spend," Austin said. "Let's say you get a can of chili, it used to be $1, now it's two-something."

Experts say families should make changes.

"Buy off brands. Buy generic brands and just look for ways to cut corners," Jankowski said.

In the meantime, families are hoping for some relief.

"If the prices keep going up, after a while we aren't going to be able to buy food for our families," Austin said.