Houston's 'ZERO HUNGER' mural is largest in city, highlights poverty problem

HOUSTON, Texas -- Houston has a hunger problem.

While it's not unique to the city, a new art installation shines a light on the challenge of living in poverty and the hope of never having to go hungry again.

The 'ZERO HUNGER' mural, created by the artist known as Dragon76, was unveiled downtown Saturday. It's a massive art project spanning five stories and 13,000 square feet on the side of a hotel.

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The work was spearheaded by Street Art for Mankind, a non-profit that supports creating art to trigger social change.

It's one of six murals aimed at raising awareness and urging more support to combat hunger around the world.

You can see the mural in-person at 710 Crawford St. in downtown Houston.

Before the COVID-19 pandemic, more than 738,000 people were believed to be considered food insecure in Harris County, according to a statement from Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner's office. Food insecurity is defined by the U.S. Office of Disease Prevention and Health Promotion as a disruption in eating patterns or food intake due to a lack of money or other resources.

The COVID-19 pandemic coupled with the Feb. winter storm have made combating hunger an even bigger challenge. If you're able to help, you can give to organizations like the Houston Food Bank. Text ABC13 to 41444 to donate directly to Houston Food Bank. Anyone who texts that number can contribute a gift of any amount. You can also volunteer your time by helping feed your neighbors in need.