Houston officials vote to require permit for outdoor music events if attendance is 500 or greater

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Wednesday, December 7, 2022
Houston officials to require permit for outdoor music events if attendance is 500 or greater in amendment to city ordinance
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This amendment is not related to the deadly Astroworld festival in 2021. This amendment, is in response to pop-up music events that leave the city scrambling to keep them under con

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) -- The City of Houston has voted to amend the city's code of ordinances to require outdoor music events on private property to have a permit if the attendance is 500 or greater.

This amendment, which was largely talked about as a response to internet influencers and producers who create pop-up music events that leave the city scrambling to keep them under control, will require events that fall under this umbrella to not only have a permit, but also provide plans for safety, staffing, traffic, and more.

It also allows the City of Houston to recoup money should they have to respond to an emergency at one of these events that isn't properly permitted.

"This is our methodology to ensure that people are safe," Mayor Pro-Tem Dave Martin said.

This amendment is not related to the deadly Astroworld festival in 2021, nor would it have offered any additional protection for that event.

NRG Park is owned by Harris County, and the City of Houston already has an agreement in place to provide security and other safety elements at that facility.

RELATED: Special Events Task Force outlines new safety measures in wake of Astroworld Festival

It also doesn't impact places that already have an occupancy permit, churches, or colleges and universities.

This amendment only applies to music events at the moment, though Mayor Sylvester Turner didn't rule out broadening that designation should Houston Police or Houston Fire see the need to do so.

"If, down the road, there's a need to look at a particular area, we can do that," Turner said. "What I said to everyone is we're dealing with private property owners, and I don't want us to throw a broad net on how people utilize their property unless it becomes a public safety issue."

The amendment goes into effect in 90 days.

"This would have the greatest impact on the health and safety of people moving forward," Turner said on the amendment.

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