Did this hurricane season seem quieter to you? Travis Herzog recaps 2022's hurricane activity

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Thursday, December 1, 2022
Did this hurricane season seem quieter to you? Travis Herzog recaps 2022's hurricane activity
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In total, 14 named storms developed, of which eight became hurricanes and two became major hurricanes: Fiona and Ian, both Category 4 storms.

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) -- The 2022 Atlantic hurricane season is officially over, and while it felt like a quieter season for most of us along the Gulf Coast, don't say that to the residents of Florida.

In total, 14 named storms developed, of which eight became hurricanes and two became major hurricanes: Fiona and Ian, both Category 4 storms.

READ MORE: Hurricane Fiona makes landfall in Puerto Rico, causing island-wide power blackout

These numbers are right around the seasonal averages from 1991-2020. NOAA's hurricane outlook released in May called for a 70% chance of 14 - 21 named storms, and this season hit the low end of that range. NOAA also gave a 65% chance that the total amount of "accumulated cyclone energy," or ACE, would be above average. This metric measures the total energy output of all the storms across the season, and ACE landed in the "near-normal" range, which only had a 25% chance of occurring.

What matters more than how many storms form is where they eventually go. We just endured the most active back-to-back Atlantic hurricane seasons on record in 2020 and 2021, with a total of 52 named storms, 19 of which made landfall in the United States. Of those 19 landfalls, 10 went into Texas or Louisiana.

Compare that to this hurricane season when southeast Texas was not once included in a forecast cone, and you can understand why it feels like a very quiet hurricane season for us.

Meanwhile, Florida endured two devastating hurricanes, Ian and Nicole. Ian was nearly a Category 5 landfall and is now Florida's deadliest hurricane since 1935. Nicole was a rare November hurricane with an unusually large size. Because of its slow perpendicular approach to the Florida coastline, it produced a powerful coastal erosion event that pummeled many homes straight into the Atlantic Ocean.

SEE ALSO: Nicole Florida: Category 1 hurricane makes landfall in FL, downgrades to tropical storm

Watch the video above from Chief Meteorologist Travis Herzog for a more detailed recap of the 2022 Atlantic hurricane season.

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