Nine arrests made in West Harris County street racing sting

It was part of an initiative targeting TX2K racing event, which draws the fastest cars across the US to compete for bragging rights
March 18, 2014 8:20:00 PM PDT
Harris County Sheriff's Office deputies are cracking down on street racing, and some drivers learned that the hard way during a bust last weekend.

The initiative targets the TX2K racing event, which draws the fastest cars from across the country to compete for bragging rights.

The nine people arrested in the initiative won't be bragging to the judge. See photos of the 9 men arrested in the sting.

YouTube video shows a high-speed street race down I-10 Friday night.

"I've personally witnessed runs to over 225 miles an hour," a veteran street racer told Eyewitness News.

The racer, who doesn't want us to reveal his identity, says the thrill and danger is all done for one thing: the bragging rights. Thousands of high-speed racers hit the streets during the TX2K weekend.

"I think it's the adrenaline rush 'cause there is always that possibility of getting arrested," the racer said.

It's illegal to street race in Texas. Catching the high-speed suspects can be difficult.

Nine people, ranging from 26 to 38, were arrested by Harris County Sheriff's Office deputies during this year's street racing bust.

"Could there have been more arrests? Sure, absolutely. A lot of the out of town guys don't know where to go," the racer told us.

The races are often caught on camera. And through the years, the cars have gotten faster, more exotic and expensive. Some spend up to $250,000 to get a Lamborghini street-racing ready.

"It's the adrenaline rush. It's the competition, it's to say that you are better than the next guy," the street racer told us.

Peter Blach, the president of TX2K, released this statement to Eyewitness News:

"We create a safe environment on a sanctioned race track. We don't endorse street racing. We can't control it. We would love to help with law enforcement."

Street racing is a Class B misdemeanor. Repeat offenders can be charged with a 2nd degree felony.

Find Foti on Facebook at ReporterFotiKallergis or on Twitter at @FotiKallergis

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