Most house fires reported on Christmas, New Year's

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Most house fires reported on Christmas, New Year's

More home fires are reported now across the nation than any time of the year.

Cooking, Christmas trees: they can all pose fire hazards.

Authorities say the blaze ripping through a Manhattan apartment building injuring more than two dozen people Thursday was caused by a woman burning a candle while wrapping gifts the sleeve of her bathrobe hanging in the open flame catching fire.

"Apparently she took the robe off and dropped it, left the apartment, and left the door open," said Lt. Anthony Mancuso with the New York Fire Department. "Now, you had fire in the hallway"

The top four days for home candle fires in the US are Christmas Eve, Christmas day, New Year's Eve and New Year's Day.



"We recommend flameless candles. Battery-operated candles. They look the same, they're very pretty," Mancuso said.

But it's not just candles.

There are more house fires in December and January than any other time.

Safety experts say keep real trees watered and turn decorative lights off when you're away or sleeping and when the tree gets dry, get rid of it.



Another big cause of fires, all that holiday cooking. Safety experts reminding people never to use water on a grease fire, use baking soda or smother it with a pan lid.
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