Former Houston Texans tight end Owen Daniels opens up about depression and his suicidal thoughts

HOUSTON, Texas (KTRK) -- Former Texans tight end Owen Daniels has had his share of struggles.

He talked to ABC13's David Nuno about his fight against depression and thoughts of ending his life in 2019. During their lengthy Facetime interview, Daniels made some frightening admissions.

"There were three or four days where I wouldn't want to leave the bedroom," Daniels said. "I did not know how to express what I was feeling."

Daniels tried to self-medicate with alcohol.

WATCH: Daniels open up about fighting depression after his football career
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Former Texans tight end Owen Daniels talked to ABC13's David Nuno about his fight against depression and thoughts of ending his life in 2019. During their lengthy Facetime intervie



"I feel like crap," Daniels remembered. "I'm going to go drink so I don't have to feel anything."

Daniels said he hit his lowest moment in March 2019, a time where he was only getting an hour of sleep a night. A disagreement with his wife on March 29 is when Daniels said he hit rock bottom.

"I told my wife that I was going to take my own life, that it was the last time she was going to talk to me," he said.

After their conversation, Daniels went for a drive but was quickly pulled over by the police. He was given two options: jail time or a psychiatric hospital.

He calls the first facility he attended a "psychiatric hospital in a horror movie."

Daniels transferred to an appropriate facility for his needs. He was inside for 40 days.

"I treated it like it was a training camp, for my mind," Daniels said.

He smiles a lot more these days, and has the skills to battle some of the dark moments life sends us. Daniels has an action plan on the mirror in his bathroom, a coping mechanism, which he has not had to use very much.

He also has more of a purpose in life.

His son, Henry, has been cancer-free for 18 months. In 2018, he was diagnosed with neuroblastoma, which is a rare cancer that strikes mainly very young children.

Beyond that, Daniels has been an assistant football coach at the Kinkaid School for the last year.

"I am proud of my story. I think it can help people," Daniels said. "Even if it is one person that could be convinced to go get help or that they are not alone."

If you or someone you know is in emotional distress or considering suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

Follow David Nuno on Facebook and Twitter.
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