HFD ready with high water vehicles ahead of expected heavy rains

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Emergency responders aren't taking any chances ahead of severe storms predicted Wednesday that could bring street flooding. (KTRK)

Emergency responders aren't taking any chances ahead of severe storms predicted Wednesday that could bring street flooding.

That's why the Houston Fire Department has put extra high water rescue vehicles at several stations around the city.

That includes Station 5 at Hammerly and Bingle in northwest Houston.

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HFD Firefighters say they've checked all of their high water vehicles in case they're needed during Wednesday's storms.



The department has already deployed an extra rescue vehicle at Station 37 on Stella Link Road.

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Courtney Fischer shows you HFD's high water vehicles



Station 57 on Memorial Drive and Station 58 on Fulton Street have permanent vehicles ready to go wherever they're needed.

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The Houston Fire Department is putting extra high water rescue vehicles on standby in case of flooding.


Officials have also been preparing for the storm threat by reducing the daily level at Lake Houston from 42.5 feet to 40 feet.

According to a release, Houston City Council Member Dave Martin held a meeting with Mayor Sylvester Turner about lowering the water level.
Council Member Martin confirmed that all gates at Lake Houston are open and the level of Lake Houston is anticipated to reach the desired 40 foot mark by Wednesday evening.

The water is going down the San Jacinto River and into the Houston Ship Channel.

Officials reduce levels at Lake Houston ahead of Wednesday's predicted storms
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Officials reduced the levels at Lake Houston ahead of Wednesday's storms.



Harris County officials also announced that they will be requesting authorization for permission to start cleaning out the West Fork of the San Jacinto River from IH-59 to Lake Houston Parkway.

Authorities are looking into the best way for storm water to flow. The county is spending $100,000 on that study.

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Related Topics:
weatherfloodingsevere weatherHoustonLake Houston
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