"Houston Pets Alive" works to make Houston no kill city

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"Houston Pets Alive" only became a physical shelter after they rescued hundreds of animals during Harvey, but they've been saving animals from euthanasia for years. (KTRK)

"Houston Pets Alive" only became a physical shelter after they rescued hundreds of animals during Harvey, but they've been saving animals from euthanasia for years.

"Houston Pets Alive" is a sister group of "Austin Pets Alive," an organization that played a large role in making Austin a no kill city, the largest in the country. "Houston Pets Alive" also strives to make Houston a no kill city.

The non-profit works to help the city shelter's most at-risk animals and to increase the shelter's live release rate. They have innovative programs targeting unweaned kittens, cats with ringworm, dogs and cats with behavioral challenges and more.

During Harvey, the group opened up their shelter at a once-flooded grocery store to welcome hundreds of animals. Some of their volunteers aiding in animal water rescues.

Catie Brown, a retired paramedic, worked with the Cajun Navy to rescue animals either left behind or separated from their owners.

"If there's one thing I could tell people, it's to prepare. Buy a life jacket for your pet and have a way for them to get out too," said Brown.

The main focus for the group after Harvey is to take in surrenders.

"Some people judge those that surrender their pets, but these pet owners have lost their homes and in some cases their livelihoods, and they can't provide for their animals," said volunteer Catie.

"Houston Pets Alive" has helped Houston shelters be no kill during Harvey by taking in these surrenders and working with groups across the country that share their values. No kill groups from California, Virginia, New York and more have taken in animals displaced by Harvey.

Over 800 animals have been rescued by the non-profit since Harvey began. Despite that large influx of animals, the kennels and facilities are kept incredibly clean and humane. Each dog, no matter the temperament, is given toys, exercise and love.

The shelter has had hundreds of volunteers from all over the country including veterinarians and vet techs. Out-of-state veterinarians have even donated their medical trucks equipped with x-rays and other supplies to help wounded or sick animals.

Their current shelter is at 8620 Stella Link Rd. in Houston, but they're looking for a more permanent home. They host regular adoption events around the city.

You can find out more about how to help here.
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Related Topics:
pets-animalsanimal rescuehurricane harveyHouston
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