Houstonians lend a hand to Louisiana flood victims

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Houstonians head to Louisiana to help flood victims.

These images may hit close to home for people in the Houston area who have been through a flood before.

The clean-up process from the deadly flood in Louisiana is still on going there and that's why a local truck club from Houston was taken aback by the situation and they decided to get together to help.

Across state lines one by one of these folks from a truck fanatic group called Houston Diesels didn't hesitate to gather donations and help our friends to the east.

"You're in a city where you expect help next thing you know you're entire life has changed in a matter of minutes because of flood waters," said Danielle Devine, Houston Diesels.

Thousands of bottles of water, clothes, canned goods and even cleaning supplies.

"I can't believe the generosity," said Carl Jackson, Acacia Shrine Temple. "So many neighborhoods are just gone"

They delivered the Houston donations to the Acacia Shrine Temple in Baton Rouge.

All of these goods will soon be sorted out and handed to families in need.

"I have a nine year old that came here two days ago that was digging his toys out of trash he couldn't understand," said one resident from Denham Springs.

It is estimated that at least 60,000 homes were damaged or destroyed in what is now the worst natural disaster since Hurricane Sandy.

"Never would have imagined that your whole life is going to be a dump," said Joy Dixon, resident.

"It's probably around $150,000 in the area where we're at," said another resident.

For the people who live in Louisiana those figures don't come close to the actual devastation Mother Nature left behind.

The clean-up process from the deadly flood in Louisiana is still on going there and that's why a local truck club from Houston was taken aback by the situation and they decided to get together to help.

Across state lines one by one of these folks from a truck fanatic group called Houston Diesels didn't hesitate to gather donations and help our friends to the east.

"You're in a city where you expect help next thing you know you're entire life has changed in a matter of minutes because of flood waters," said Danielle Devine of Houston Diesels.

Thousands of bottles of water, clothes, canned goods and even cleaning supplies have been donated.

"I can't believe the generosity," said Carl Jackson, Acacia Shrine Temple. "So many neighborhoods are just gone."

They delivered the Houston donations to the Acacia Shrine Temple in Baton Rouge.

All of these goods will soon be sorted out and handed to families in need.

"I have a nine year old that came here two days ago that was digging his toys out of trash, he couldn't understand," said one resident from Denham Springs.

It is estimated that at least 60,000 homes were damaged or destroyed in what is now the worst natural disaster since Hurricane Sandy.

"Never would have imagined that your whole life is going to be a dump," said Joy Dixon, resident.

"It's probably around $150,000 in the area where we're at," said another resident.

For the people who live in Louisiana those figures don't come close to the actual devastation Mother Nature left behind.
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