Tips to finding the perfect personal trainer

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Before you invest your money in your health, make sure your personal trainer relationship is a perfect fit (KTRK)

Now is the time of year where many people consider investing in a personal trainer to help reach 2015 goals.

Hiring a trainer is a major investment in your health, and you want to make sure you are hiring the right person.

Certified personal trainer Kathy Laucius with TheTimeIsNowFitness.com has tips to make your client and trainer relationship work. Before you hire someone, make sure the trainer is educated and certified.

"I highly recommend that you do some research that your trainer has been certified at least with a certification with a 4 year degree, as well as CPR certified - very important," Laucius said.

Before you commit, schedule a consultation with a prospective trainer.

"If the trainer will not give you a consultation first, at least 15- 30 minutes of their time, that is a huge red flag. No actual gym time with be charged, but just you and me sitting down, you get to know me, I get to know you. That is the fair way," Laucius said.

If you can, stick around and watch your trainer in action at the gym.

"You want to make sure the trainer is not giving the each client the same workout," Laucius recommends. "Do they pay attention? Are they walking away? Are they on their phones?"

Time is money when it comes to personal trainers, and you want to make sure yours starts and ends on time. Also, make sure your time with the trainer is the most efficient workout. You don't need a trainer to watch you warm up.

"You are not paying me for me to watch you up on a treadmill," Laucius said.

Once you've found the perfect fit for a personal trainer, do not give a lot of cash up front for a big package of sessions. Pay only 2-4 weeks up front, at the most.

"I believe that trainers that ask for a large amount of money up front even 2-3 months, there is something wrong with that picture," Laucius said. "You should be able to try the trainer and make sure it's a good fit."

If your trainer works with a partner or an assistant, beware.

"It's definitely a bait and switch that is used quite a bit," Laucius said. "You want to make sure if your trainer has people that works underneath them, who are you paying for? Are you paying for the trainer that brought you in to the gym or are you paying for someone that has been certified for a year or two? There is definitely a price difference."

If your trainer tries to sell you supplements to accompany your workouts, it's a good idea to check out the prices online before you buy them. Often times, they can be found for a fraction of the price.

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