Woman contracts Zika virus in Rio Grande Valley

A technician of the Fiocruz institue stores Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to be used in research, in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

A woman in Cameron County, Texas, in the Rio Grande Valley contracted the first case of Zika virus transmitted in the state, according to the Texas Department of State Health Services.

The woman is not pregnant and hasn't traveled to any of the high-risk areas where Zika is known to spread, a news release said. A blood test shows she also can not spread the virus.

"We knew it was only a matter of time before we saw a Zika case spread by a mosquito in Texas," said Dr. John Hellerstedt, DSHS commissioner, in a news release. "We still don't believe the virus will become widespread in Texas, but there could be more cases, so people need to protect themselves from mosquito bites, especially in parts of the state that stay relatively warm in the fall and winter."

Testing is ongoing around the area where the woman lives to learn more about the mosquito population in the area.

Common symptoms of the Zika virus include fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis, according to the CDC. Approximately one in five people infected with the virus show symptoms. Severe complications from the virus that require hospitalization are rare, according to the CDC.



The virus has been associated with a rise of microcephaly, a type of birth defect. It has affected more than 4,000 babies in Brazil.

EMBED </>More News Videos

Two cases of Zika virus are now reported in the Houston area.



Health officials discourage pregnant women from traveling to Central or South America. If you must, they suggest wearing clothing and bug spray. They are also urging you to eliminate any standing water around your home or workplace in order to limit the number of places in which mosquitoes can breed.

EMBED </>More News Videos

Medical expert Dr. Richard Besser explains Zika virus



Doctors at Texas Children's Hospital are encouraging expectant mothers who think they may have symptoms of the virus to come in for an examination. Experts say the best line of defense right now is to protect yourself from mosquito bites. For pregnant women, there are a few sprays on the market that do not contain DEET, including Buzz Away Extreme, SkeeterScreen and BugBand.

EMBED </>More News Videos

The Zika virus is spreading rapidly, causing concern at the World Health Organization.

Zika symptoms diagnosis and treatment from the CDC

Symptoms
  • About 1 in 5 people infected with Zika virus become ill (i.e., develop Zika).

  • The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes). Other common symptoms include muscle pain and headache. The incubation period (the time from exposure to symptoms) for Zika virus disease is not known, but is likely to be a few days to a week.

  • The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week.

  • Zika virus usually remains in the blood of an infected person for a few days but it can be found longer in some people.

  • Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon.

  • Deaths are rare.


Diagnosis

  • The symptoms of Zika are similar to those of dengue and chikungunya, diseases spread through the same mosquitoes that transmit Zika.

  • See your healthcare provider if you develop the symptoms described above and have visited an area where Zika is found.

  • If you have recently traveled, tell your healthcare provider when and where you traveled.

  • Your healthcare provider may order blood tests to look for Zika or other similar viruses like dengue or chikungunya.

Treatment

  • No vaccine or medications are available to prevent or treat Zika infections.

Treat the symptoms:

    Get plenty of rest
  • Drink fluids to prevent dehydration

  • Take medicines, such as acetaminophen or paracetamol, to relieve fever and pain

  • Do not take aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like ibuprofen and naproxen. Aspirin and NSAIDs should be avoided until dengue can be ruled out to reduce the risk of hemorrhage (bleeding). If you are taking medicine for another medical condition, talk to your healthcare provider before taking additional medication.

  • If you have Zika, avoid mosquito bites for the first week of your illness.

  • During the first week of infection, Zika virus can be found in the blood and passed from an infected person to another mosquito through mosquito bites.
Related Topics:
newszika virusBrownsville
(Copyright ©2016 KTRK-TV. All Rights Reserved.)

Load Comments