Local clinic confirms first pregnant Zika patient

An Aedes aegypti mosquito is photographed through a microscope at the Fiocruz institute in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2016. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)

A local clinic has confirmed their first pregnant Zika virus patient.

Legacy Community Health Services released a statement on their website that read, in part, "The woman had lived in El Salvador, where the virus is widespread, prior to coming to the U.S. earlier this year, but it's not clear whether she contracted the virus directly through a mosquito bite in El Salvador or through sexual transmission with a male partner. Either way, the Centers for Disease Control has said definitively the virus can cause severe birth defects.

"We are closely monitoring the patient through her pregnancy and hope for the best for mom and baby," said Dr. Natalie Vanek, a Legacy Community Health infectious disease specialist.

"Today we are re-issuing our advisory to pregnant women not to travel down to the Central and South American countries where the virus is rampant, and want to make the broader Houston community aware the virus can be transmitted sexually. We are focused on prevention, not panic."

Common symptoms of the Zika virus include fever, rash, joint pain and conjunctivitis, according to the CDC. Approximately one in five people infected with the virus show symptoms. Severe complications from the virus that require hospitalization are rare, according to the CDC.



The virus has been associated with a rise of microcephaly, a type of birth defect. It has affected more than 4,000 babies in Brazil.

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Two cases of Zika virus are now reported in the Houston area.



Health officials discourage pregnant women from traveling to Central or South America. If you must, they suggest wearing clothing and bug spray with DEET which will protect you. They are also urging you to eliminate any standing water around your home or workplace in order to limit the number of places in which mosquitos can breed.

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Medical expert Dr. Richard Besser explains Zika virus

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The Zika virus is spreading rapidly, causing concern at the World Health Organization.

Zika symptoms diagnosis and treatment from the CDC

Symptoms

  • About 1 in 5 people infected with Zika virus become ill (i.e., develop Zika).

  • The most common symptoms of Zika are fever, rash, joint pain, or conjunctivitis (red eyes). Other common symptoms include muscle pain and headache. The incubation period (the time from exposure to symptoms) for Zika virus disease is not known, but is likely to be a few days to a week.

  • The illness is usually mild with symptoms lasting for several days to a week.

  • Zika virus usually remains in the blood of an infected person for a few days but it can be found longer in some people.

  • Severe disease requiring hospitalization is uncommon.

  • Deaths are rare.


Diagnosis

  • The symptoms of Zika are similar to those of dengue and chikungunya, diseases spread through the same mosquitoes that transmit Zika.

  • See your healthcare provider if you develop the symptoms described above and have visited an area where Zika is found.

  • If you have recently traveled, tell your healthcare provider when and where you traveled.

  • Your healthcare provider may order blood tests to look for Zika or other similar viruses like dengue or chikungunya.

Treatment

  • No vaccine or medications are available to prevent or treat Zika infections.

Treat the symptoms:

    Get plenty of rest
  • Drink fluids to prevent dehydration

  • Take medicines, such as acetaminophen or paracetamol, to relieve fever and pain

  • Do not take aspirin and other non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), like ibuprofen and naproxen. Aspirin and NSAIDs should be avoided until dengue can be ruled out to reduce the risk of hemorrhage (bleeding). If you are taking medicine for another medical condition, talk to your healthcare provider before taking additional medication.

  • If you have Zika, avoid mosquito bites for the first week of your illness.

  • During the first week of infection, Zika virus can be found in the blood and passed from an infected person to another mosquito through mosquito bites.


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