"Golden Girls" elephants moving to Florida to retire

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Zoo elephants from Virginia are retiring "Golden Girl"-style to Florida (KTRK)

Zoo officials are comparing two African elephants' move to Florida to the hit TV show "Golden Girls."

Officials say the African elephants from Virginia have arrived at their new home at Zoo Miami and will eventually get some new roommates in their new southern home, just like the Blanche, Dorothy, Rose and Sophia on the legendary show.

However, need a little time to adjust, as local station WSVN reports.

"Cita" and "Lisa" arrived in South Florida after a 23-hour long drive down I-95 from the Virginia Zoo.

Ron Magill, communications director of Zoo Miami, said, "I kinda like to draw the parallel to what I call the 'Golden Girls', they're coming down to the Club Med for elephants."

"Cita" and "Lisa" arrived in South Florida after a 23-hour long drive down I-95 from the Virginia Zoo.
As part of an exchange program from the association of zoos and aquariums.

Ron Magill, communications director of Zoo Miami, said, "(There's a) requirement that zoos maintaining elephants must keep them in herds of three or four and that's to satisfy their social and psychological needs. As they get older they might need more social needs that's popular with apes, elephants are kind of the same so they need to meet and live with more of their kind."

Magill explained elephants need to be at a facility where 12 months around the year they can be exposed to the sunshine and climate similar to their origins.

After being acclimated to their new home, they'll join "Peggy" and "Mabel," zoo Miami's residential duo.

However, as soon as the new roommates were taken out of their crates, the veteran elephants in Miami got a little excited.

Magill said, "They're amped up -- no question about it. When we brought the crates back to the barn, Peggy and Mabel immediately smelled the new elephants ---they're trunks went up, their ears went out."

The new animals will be introduced slowly.

Magill said, "They'll be able to touch each other and smell each other and then we're just gonna have to read their behavior and see what happens."


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animalentertainmentu.s. & worldFlorida
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