Tips to keep hardwood floors looking new for years

A few tricks of the trade can keep original hardwoods looking beautiful, and the process won't break the bank
October 17, 2013 3:16:17 PM PDT
From high-traffic areas, to regular wear and tear, keeping up with beautiful hardwood flooring can be costly. But there are a few simple things you can do to keep them looking new for many years to come.

Nestled in the historic heart of Galveston Island, you'll find the Lasker Inn Bed & Breakfast.

"Within walking distance to the beach, walking distance to the Pleasure Pier and walking distance to the historic Strand area," said Lasker Inn owner Linda Denson.

The home was originally built in 1870. After surviving the Great Storm of 1900, it was transformed into an orphanage, which ran for 90 years before closing its doors in 1990.

Denson purchased the home a few years ago and started restoring it to its original condition.

"Spent over a year restoring the home," she said.

Part of the Historic Homes Tour, it is now open to the public as a bed and breakfast and event center.

"If you can imagine after an event or a wedding on a weekend, you've got hundreds of people traipsing over these floors once a week, we spend an afternoon cleaning the floors," event manager Richard Conner said.

Connor coordinates special events at the Inn. He uses a few tricks of the trade to keep the original hardwoods looking beautiful.

Start off by cleaning the floors with any wood cleaning agent. Then you're ready for the restoration products.

First on our list is the Minwax High Gloss Reviver.

"So you can that the reviver actually puts the shine back on top of the wood. Actually looks like a polyurethane coat," Connor said.

Conner says you can use a rag, or a push sponge to apply any of the reviver products. The Minwax reviver can be found at your local hardware store for around $20.

Next is the Bona floor finishing polish. It's a few dollars less than the Minwax product, and not as glossy.

"If the floors go untreated, they lose their luster. And then you've got old dirt and grease and grime that are built up on them and set into the grain of the wood. And so it takes a little more effort to get those cleaned up," Conner said.

For those black shoe scuff marks, to save big, a simple product from your pantry will do the trick.

"A baking soad paste is very good at getting those up," Conner said.

Conner says just mix water and baking soda into a paste and rub the mark gently with a wet sponge until it comes out.

And for those heavier scratches and deep marks, this Minwax Express Color stain and finish tube for $5, will work miracles.

"It's magic," Conner said.

The entire restoration project costs about $50.

Find Patricia on Facebook at ABC13PatriciaLopez or on Twitter at @patricialopez13


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