'Killing Fields' victims' DNA to be extracted, may help lead to their identities

March 25, 2014 8:28:00 AM PDT
There's new hope for investigators trying to learn the identities of two women whose bodies were found dumped in what has become notoriously known as the Killing Fields. We're talking about an area just west of Interstate 45 on Calder Road, where the bodies of four women were discovered in the 80's, and 90's.

The field at Calder Road and Ervin has changed since the four women were found there in the 1980s and 1990s. It now has a fence and some buildings. Half of the victims were never identified, but that too could change soon.

At the League City Police Department, a decades-old oversight is now corrected.

"Our fault, but we rectified that by having the bones taken to North Texas. DNA is going to be extracted. The girls are going to be fed into CODIS," League City Det. Morton Grant said.

The DNA from the two never-identified murder victims from the notorious League City "Killing Fields" will soon be entered into a national database, and investigators hope they will soon be identified.

"It just gives us a whole other area to investigate who the girls are, where they're from, who they're around," Grant said.

And that could lead detectives to the killer - or killers.

The first victim, Heidi Fye, was discovered in the field in 1984. Then two years later, the still-unidentified Jane Doe was found. The sketch of her was based on her skull. That was followed by the discovery of 16-year-old Laura Miller that same year, a year after she'd gone missing.

The other unidentified Janet Doe was found five years later in 1991. Her sketch, too, was based off her skull.

On Monday, Laura Miller's father and Texas Equusearch founder Tim Miller responded to the news the two nameless victims may soon be identified through CODIS.

"Getting both these girls identified so the family could have closure would mean a lot," Miller said.

Detective grant says there are a few people of interest in the case, but right now their focus is on getting the two women identified.

Meanwhile they say it will be about two or three weeks before the DNA is entered into CODIS, and no telling how long it will take to make a match after that.

CODIS accepts DNA samples from family members of missing people to help identify victims. Usually, the best sample is given by the mother of the missing person.


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