New workout more than just a trend

September 28, 2011 8:05:58 AM PDT
If you thought pumping iron was the only way to tone and build your muscles, think again. What if you could do it, using nothing more than your own body? That's what TRX is all about and now it's about to become more than just a fitness fad.

This is not a class for circus acrobats. It's called TRX, and believe it or not, you don't have to be in tip-top shape to do this.

"The great thing about the TRX is you can make it as easy or as hard as you'd like," trainer Matt Blackwell said.

It's a different kind of full body workout. No heavy, bulky weights are required. A nylon strap is all you need to tone and build lean muscle.

"When these straps are employed, it really does force you to use your core, use your stabilizer muscles that you don't use in regular lifting," participant Gary Ehlers said.

TRX, which is a form of suspension training, was created and designed by a Navy SEAL as a way to train for combat in the field.

"It's portable, easy to set up. You can take it outside and hook it to a tree," Blackwell said.

Blackwell has been working with straps for six years and teaches TRX workshops at The Houstonian. He says without a doubt, this not just another fitness craze.

"I think it's going to be integrated. As far as in the industry, it's going to be a staple," Blackwell said.

The principle behind TRX is simple. It develops core body strength as well as joint and muscular stability using your own body weight.

"Why is working the core so important?" we asked Blackwell.

"Well, if you think about it, everything comes from the core. It's the foundation, it's the strength," he replied.

While some would argue that weaker fitness enthusiasts may not have the skills to use the system safely because of its demands on the core, Blackwell says suspension training essentially turns every movement in a total body one, reducing the chance of injury.

"I felt safe and secure. That's my big thing because I have some injuries and I want to keep moving my whole life," participant Tanya Strum said.

We experienced first hand how the exercises become progressively harder and more challenging as you go. No pain, no gain.

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