Many outraged over airport screening procedures

November 16, 2010 10:20:05 AM PST
More travelers and airline workers are voicing outrage over new anti-terrorism screening procedures. Fliers now have the option between full-body image detectors or probing pat-downs and many consider the new procedures invasive and harmful. Thanksgiving is just around the corner and if passengers' sentiments are anything like they are right now, it's going to be a bumpy holiday before they even step onto the plane. John Tyner, a protesting passenger from San Diego, became a hit on You Tube after he recorded his objection to the new, more invasive security measures.

"If you touch my junk I'm going to have you arrested," said Tyner on the video. "I don't understand how a sexual assault can be made a condition of my flying."

"It's not considered a sexual assault," a TSA worker could be heard answering.

"It would be if you weren't the government," Tyner said. "I'd like only my wife and my doctor to touch me there."

He's not alone. At Bush Airport, the full-body scans are raising concerns about privacy and radiation danger while the 'enhanced' pat-down process makes some people feel violated.

"I think it's a real invasion of privacy," said air passenger Roger Reuter. "I disagree with it."

"Untrustworthy, kind of scary for my kids," said air passenger Tanya Horne.

There are 385 full body scanners at 68 airports, including Bush Intercontinental Airport. Pilots and flight attendants groups are worried about the cancer risk their members might face from repeated exposure to radiation and fliers tell us they share that concern.

"I find the whole body scan like really scary and I'm not signing up for that because it could be like cancer," said air passenger Amber Blue. "I mean, it's doing all kinds of things. I don't know what."

But Homeland Security Secretary Janet Napolitano says this is the price people pay for air safety and some passengers say they agree.

"I don't have a problem with it," said air passenger Nicole German. "I've gone through it. I've been patted down, and it's not offensive to me."

Later today, the new head of the TSA, John Pistole, is expected to address the issue at a senate hearing about how to keep cargo planes safe.

The TSA says that passenger from San Diego, the one who protested it and put it all on YouTube, is still under investigation. However, A TSA representative says that people can be fined and it's at the agency's legal department's discretion.


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