Job retraining fast track to finding new career?

October 27, 2010 3:34:13 PM PDT
Thirty-three weeks -- that's how long it takes for the average out-of-work person to find a new job. But landing that new job could happen a lot faster with the help of a few weeks of job retraining. There are certain fields that are looking for workers where you can land a job without a long wait.

Back when getting a new job only took a few weeks at most, the idea of getting retrained for a new career did not make much sense. But some people say they have been out of work for a full year -- some even longer than that. For those workers, retraining may be a faster way to get a job.

As the economy slowed, Anne Newsome found making ends meet as a hair stylist was not easy.

"The business was up and down; business wasn't steady all the time," Newsome said.

So Newsome has decided to go back to school to become a nurse. It will take her about two years but she says there will almost certainly be a job waiting.

"That was a great factor, because even when you finish the program, it doesn't matter, nursing, they always need nurses," she said.

While Newsome is willing to plan long term, those out of work do not have to spend years in school to get trained for a new job in a new career.

"It requires some specialized training, but you can do that anywhere between three to six months, sometimes to a year," said Madeline Burillo with HCC's Division of Extended Learning.

In fact, someone with prior computer skills can take a six-week course and be certified to work in the electronic medical records field. The entire course load costs just $125.

"There is now new legislation that requires doctors to go through electronic medical record processing," Burillo said. "That now has triggered a new wave of jobs in that area."

Community colleges are working with industry leaders to find areas with job growth and then offer training for those careers.

Right now the medical field is the rising star in job growth area, but we're not talking about being a doctor or nurse; courses include medical billing and coding, phlebotomy and sterile processing.

Other fast-track career areas include Microsoft-certified systems administrator, property management and maintenance, and human resources.

Keep in mind, some of these fast track courses require prior experience in some areas, but if you have been waiting for months for something to open up, some of these fields are projected to need a lot of extra workers.

The cost of the courses depends a lot on how long you plan to go to school, if you are training for an entry-level job, the costs can be just a few hundred dollars; it just depends on the field and how much training you already have.

Houston Community College offers more than 30 short-term career training certificates in the fastest growing job markets in the greater Houston area. You can increase your earning potential in as little as two to nine months.

Residential Wiring ? Earn up to $27,000+
Truck Driving ? Earn up to $33,000+
Law Enforcement Academy ? Earn up to $40,000+
Fire Academy ? Earn up to $42,000+
Emergency Medical Technician ? Earn up to $35,000+
Medical Billing and Coding ? Earn up to $16,000 - $27,000+
Certified Nurse Aide ? Earn up to $20,000+
Phlebotomy Technician ? Earn up to $8-$16 per hour
EKG Technician ? Earn up to $8-$16 per hour
Microsoft Certified Systems Administrator ? Earn up to $32,000 to $52,000
Property Management ? Earn up to $29,000+
Property Maintenance ? Earn up to $26,000+
Human Resources ? Earn up to $30,000
Child Development ? Earn up to $30,000

Info provided by Dr. Gary Friery, dean of technical education at San Jacinto College North:

  1. Cosmetology - Large increase in numbers of students of all ages. This includes traditional students as well as high school dual credit and older students, workers who are trying to switch fields after being laid off from their old careers and not finding work. There are jobs in this area now.
  2. Electrical Technology - Increase in numbers of students of all ages. This includes traditional students as well as high school dual credit and older students, workers who are trying to switch fields after being laid off from their old careers and not finding work. There are jobs in this area now.
  3. Automotive Collision - Increase in numbers of students of all ages. This includes traditional students as well as high school dual credit and older students, workers who are trying to switch fields after being laid off from their old careers and not finding work. There are jobs in this area now.
  4. Welding - Increase in numbers of students of all ages. This includes traditional students as well as high school dual credit and older students, workers who are trying to switch fields after being laid off from their old careers and not finding work. There are jobs in this area now.
  5. Diesel Technology - Large Increase in numbers of students of all ages. This includes traditional students as well as high school dual credit and older students, workers who are trying to switch fields after being laid off from their old careers and not finding work.
  6. Health Information Technology - Large increase in numbers of students of all ages. This includes traditional students as well as high school dual credit and older students, workers who are trying to switch fields after being laid off from their old careers and not finding work. There are jobs in this area now.

  7. Heating, Air Conditioning and Refrigeration - Increase in numbers of students of all ages. This includes traditional students as well as high school dual credit and older students, workers who are trying to switch fields after being laid off from their old careers and not finding work. There are jobs in this area now.


Load Comments