Jessica Willey's account of Clemens' arraignment

Seven-time Cy Young winner, baseball pitcher Roger Clemens leaves federal court in Washington, Monday, Aug. 30, 2010, after pleading not guilty to charges of lying to Congress about whether he used steroids or human growth hormone. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)

August 30, 2010 2:59:10 PM PDT
Roger Clemens wore khaki pants, a navy blazer and printed tie to his arraignment in federal court in Washington, D.C. When Judge Reggie Walton asked the seven-time Cy Young Award winner to enter a plea, he emphatically said, "Not guilty, your honor." It is the only time Clemens spoke in open court.

The judge set jury selection for April 5, 2011, which depending on the calendar, is likely Opening Day for some Major League Baseball team.

The hearing was held in the U.S. District Court's Ceremonial Courtroom which is usually used for high-profile matters and ceremonies. It seats about 200. On Monday it was half full.

"The fact he made not guilty plea in that loud, clear voice means there's not going to be any plea deals. This case is going to trial," said Roger Cossack ESPN Legal Analyst.

Inside, we learned the government has mounds of discovery material including grand jury testimony, witness statements and also scientific evidence -- presumably the bloody gauze and syringes former trainer Brian McNamee claims he used to inject Clemens with performance-enhancing drugs, though his lawyer wouldn't let on.

"We'll have to see," Hardin said.

Clemens didn't say a word as he left the federal courthouse. He was swarmed by cameras but didn't shy away.

Hardin did tell reporters there is a significant amount of scientific evidence that needed to be tested just before getting in a black SUV and driving off. Clemens was riding shotgun.

Earlier Monday, the former baseball star had his fingerprints and photograph taken by the U.S. Marshal's Service. The Rocket was booked under his given name William R. Clemens.

[ READ THE FULL INDICTMENT AGAINST ROGER CLEMENS ]


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