It's residents vs. hogs in Spring

December 30, 2008 4:44:18 PM PST
They're sloppy, hairy, and snort. And they're winning a battle against homeowners in an upscale Spring subdivision. [SIGN UP: Get headlines and breaking news sent to you]

Often, resident will wake up to see their beautiful landscaping in pieces. At the heart of the problem -- wild hogs.

"We're looking at a real mess," said resident Priscilla Spiller.

Spiller says this is the fourth night in a row wild hogs have dug up her front yard.

"It's a very sad situation because they're absolutely destroying the property," she said.

Spiller and her neighbors believe 20 to 30 wild hogs live in a wooded area surrounding their Montgomery County subdivision called Spring Trails.

One hog shows up every day at Ken Henderson's house.

"We begin to see them come into our yard to tear up the gardens, so I've begun to see them gather around this bird feeder," he told us.

While no one disputes the wild hogs were there before the subdivision, animal experts say continued development will eventually push the wild hogs away.

"Remember to keep all food inside because if they find food source at your home, they're going to continue to hang around," said Meena Nandlal with the SPCA.

It's advice residents say they already follow, but it's only lead to more destruction.

"Every day, I'm having to replant, clean up, pick up pig droppings," said resident Susie Savage.

"I have my little newborn baby," said resident Ashlye Vulgamore. "They're very aggressive, very dangerous and I do not want to get up close and personal with one."

We talked with officials with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Commission, who say it's legal hunt and kill feral hogs, but there are specific restrictions. You must have a valid hunting license and you must follow local ordinances when it comes to firearms.

They also tell us that any wild animal has the potential of being dangerous, but feral hogs typically prefer to run and escape danger. If one is cornered, their razor sharp tusks and speed could cause serious injury. In general, diseases from wild hogs do not pose a significant threat to humans.

The estimated population of feral hogs in Texas is in excess of 1. 5 million.

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