A look at historic Galveston buildings

<div class="meta image-caption"><div class="origin-logo origin-image none"><span>none</span></div><span class="caption-text">James Holmes of Spring, Texas, carries two containers of gasoline from a service station that opened in Spring, Texas, Sunday, Sept. 14, 2008. Customers waited in line for over three hours to fill their cars or containers after the station used a generator to run the station&#39;s pumps. Hurricane Ike caused power outages throughout greater Houston area. &#40;AP Photo&#47;Houston Chronicle, Steve Campbell&#41;</span></div>
September 15, 2008 6:04:23 PM PDT
Some 7,000 documented historic buildings are located on Galveston, an island that served as a gateway to Texas in the state's early days. Of those, it is estimated as many as 1,500 of the structures sustained serious damage during Hurricane Ike. HURRICANE IKE: Watch live | Breaking news on Ike | Roadway incidents | Interactive tracking | Viewer photos of Ike | Doppler radar | During the storm | After the storm | Hurricane guide

An early assessment by the Galveston Historical Foundation shows the following conditions at historic sites.

U.S. CUSTOM HOUSE: Built in 1861, this structure serves as the headquarters for the Galveston Historical Foundation. It was flooded by as much as 8 feet of water, which damaged files, archives and equipment. An upstairs door is damaged. Roof damage, if any, is unknown.

ASHTON VILLA: This 1859 Italianate mansion lost two to three windows on its second floor and had up to 18 inches of flooding that likely caused extensive first-floor furniture damage.

BISHOP'S PALACE: This home, also known as the 1889 Gresham House, is the most visited historic building in Galveston. It appears to have sustained little damage, as was the case in the catastrophic 1900 hurricane. The home had as much as 3 feet of flooding on its bottom floor, which is slightly below ground level and is used for a ticket counter and offices. That floor is under renovation to become a visitors center.

THE ELISSA: The famous 1877 tall ship, restored in 1982 by the foundation, lost several sails but otherwise seemed to ride out the hurricane well. The vessel is attached to the shore through large steel pipes driven into the harbor bottom.

TEXAS SEAPORT MUSEUM AT PIER 22: This is Elissa's home berth. It suffered damage to the brick and wooden pier, with a suspected total loss to the wooden workshops used for maintenance of the ship. The museum itself, in the 1990 Jones Building, suffered little damage.

THE SANTA MARIA: This 1937 restored wooden shrimp boat fared well in her slip near the Texas Seaport Museum with only minor damage.

MICHEL B. MENARD HOUSE: Built in 1838, the city's oldest residential house sustained little visible damage.

SAMUEL MAY WILLIAMS HOUSE: Constructed in 1839 and one of the oldest residential houses on the island, it appeared to sustain little damage.

GARTEN VEREIN: An 1880 German dancing pavilion in Kempner Park managed by the foundation, Garten Verein appears to be undamaged.

ST. JOSEPH'S CHURCH BUILDING: The state's oldest German Catholic church building, the wooden St. Joseph's building was built in 1859. It closed as a church in 1968. The building lost one window but otherwise appears undamaged.

HISTORICAL FOUNDATION WAREHOUSE: This warehouse on Mechanic Street was inundated with at least 10 feet of water and sustained extensive damage. Much of its contents was destroyed, including equipment used during Dickens on the Strand, the popular holiday festival.

GALVESTON COUNTY HISTORICAL MUSEUM: Housed in the 1921 City National Bank Building, the museum is a joint project of the historical foundation and the Galveston County Commissioners Court. A floodwater line can be seen below the entrance to the first floor. Unless there is roof damage, the building is believed to be unharmed.

Source: Galveston Historical Foundation

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