Teens turn tech skills into thriving business

August 20, 2008 5:03:35 PM PDT
A group of young entrepreneurs turned their interest in computers into a full-fledged business. They started dabbling in computers when they were about five years old, so it's no wonder this group of friends have already turned their computer skills into a successful venture. While many of their peers flip burgers or bag groceries for extra cash, these teens help companies craft an online presence and much more.

"Taking the logo, getting it on as many products as possible, everything from commercial items to business cards and letterhead, getting it on the website," explained Austin Brinson, the founder of Texas Power Tech.

They create slick websites loaded with interactive technology and graphics that buck convention.

"People come to us when they have a growing business and they want to get put on the map, or they're expanding," said graphics designer Nathan Booker.

Doing things the unconventional way feels natural at Texas Power Tech. Everyone who works there is just 17 years old -- including CEO and founder, Austin Brinson. He started the company his freshman year of high school.

He recalled, "My parents helped me at first, just doing all the taxes and everything. Then the trick was finding the right people to get all the work done right."

The Woodlands teen knew who to call -- his best friends.

"I've known Austin since probably first grade," Booker recalled. "I think we were in the Cub Scouts together."

A computer wiz himself, Booker creates graphic designs, while Nishanth Nagavelli jazzes up the sites with interactive features. He taught himself how to do that in the 8th grade.

He said, "I just opened a book up of a couple of website tutorials one day because I was bored. I just looked up how to do it, and before you know it, I kind of picked it up a bit."

For everyone at Texas Power Tech, picking up IT skills has proven profitable.

"We've been growing a lot," Brinson said. "This last year we pulled in over $40,000 in sales since January."

While the revenue keeps the company growing, the teens also realize what they're gaining much more.

Booker explained, "I've learned to deal with clients and work in a professional setting. That's really valuable experience."

Most of the students with the company will graduate from the Academy of Science and Technology at the end of the year, but since most of this work can be done remotely, they will continue on with the company.

This story was brought to you through our partnership with Houston Community Newspapers. You can read more about these young entrepreneurs in The Woodlands Villager.

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