HISD gets $1.3M for Teaching American History

April 2, 2008 4:24:12 PM PDT
The Houston Independent School District has been awarded a three-year $1.35 million Teaching American History grant designed to raise student achievement by providing teachers with in-depth, professional development in American history, U.S. Secretary of Education Margaret Spellings announced today. This year, the Teaching American History program will award 121 new grants worth $114.7 million to schools districts in 40 states nationwide."The Teaching American History grant program offers educators opportunities to work with colleges and universities, nonprofit organizations, libraries, or museums to learn more about our country's history, culture, and democratic tradition," said Secretary Spellings. "By providing professional development for teachers, we can help them support young people in becoming active, informed citizens."

The Houston Independent School District, in collaboration with 26 school districts in Harris County, will create a comprehensive American history education program titled "Texas Teachers Teaching American History (T3AH)," which will increase student achievement in American history at targeted campuses (those identified for improvement, corrective action and restructuring) and provide a systematic approach to increasing teacher content knowledge and the quality of American history instruction at those campuses. In addition, the project will create a strong team of teachers to support rigorous American history standards. For additional information, contact Project Director Angela Miller, (713) 556-6823.

The Teaching American History grant program is designed to improve student achievement by enhancing teachers' knowledge of traditional American history through intensive ongoing professional development in both content and research-based teaching strategies. Grants fund projects for up to five years, and grantees must partner with one or more organizations that have extensive knowledge of American history, including libraries, museums, nonprofit history or humanities organizations and higher education institutions.

History is one of the core academic subjects under the No Child Left Behind Act. The most recent National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), commonly known as the "Nation's Report Card," shows some overall improvement in history performance at all three grade levels, however, less than one-quarter of America's students in grades 4, 8 and 12 are performing at the highest, or proficient level, in American history.

More information about the Teaching American History Grant program is available at: http://www.ed.gov/programs/teachinghistory/index.html.


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